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sábado, 19 de junho de 2010

Notícias

Uma Córnea Artificial, foi criada na Europa, e poderá restaurar a visão a Milhares de pessoas:
An artificial cornea (prototype shown here) could restore sight to thousands starting this year


Germany’s Artificial Cornea Ready To Restore Sight To Thousands
June 2nd, 2010 by Aaron Saenz

An expansive EU project to produce an artificial cornea has found success thanks to the work of Joachim Storsberg of the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP in Germany. Storsberg helped develop a new version of an opthalmological polymer which the eye will bond to and still allow to function properly. The new polymer could help restore sight to thousands waiting for corneal transplants around the world. The artificial cornea has passed clinical trials and is ready to see expanded use in patients this year. Very soon those with corneal blindness may find a ready cure in the form of the new implant.

Corneal blindness affects millions around the world. According to the WHO, about 5 million cases of blindness in the world (as of 2001) were a result of corneal damage or dystrophy. We’ve seen several high-tech approaches to fighting corneal blindness including the application of embryonic stem cells to generate new tissue. For most of those affected around the world, however, corneal transplants represent the surest and most accessible treatment for their condition. A readily accessible, easily made artificial cornea is a huge boon to corneal transplants.

Telescópios de Alta qualidade, para o Povo!

The 91-actuator Array That Manipulates the Liquid Mirror:  Denis Brousseau, et al.

Liquid Mirror Breakthrough Could Make State-of-the-Art Optics Cheap
By Clay Dillow

A $120 million Earth-based telescope using brand new adaptive optics just trumped Hubble's deep space image clarity three-fold, but such high tech optics aren't just reserved for high-dollar observatories. A breakthrough in deformable liquid mirror technology could drastically reduce the price associated with adaptive optics, making the best in high-tech telescopes more widely available.

Imagine a volume of reflective liquid like mercury in a bowl. Spin the bowl, and the liquid will push toward the edges, forming a concave mirror as smooth as the best mirror glass. But unlike highly specialized mirror glass, it's just a bowl of mercury. It costs next to nothing by comparison. 


...E o Grafeno caminha a passos largos para um PC perto de vós, agora já desenharam padrões neles: 
Writing Circuits on Graphene
A heated AFM tip can draw nanometers-wide conductive lines on graphene oxide.
By Prachi Patel
Hot wire: An AFM tip heated to over 150 °C can etch an insulating graphene oxide surface to create thin conductive nanoscale wires.
Credit: Debin Wang, Georgia Tech

Using a heated atomic force microscope tip, researchers have drawn nanoscale conductive patterns on insulating graphene oxide. This simple trick to control graphene oxide's conductivity could pave the way for etching electronic circuits into the carbon material, an important advance toward high-speed, low-power, and potentially cheaper computer processors.

Graphene, an atom-thick carbon sheet, is a promising replacement for silicon in electronic circuits, since it transports electrons much faster. IBM researchers have already made transistors, the building blocks of electronic circuits, with graphene that work 10 times faster than their silicon counterparts. But to make these transistors, researchers first have to alter the graphene's electronic properties by cutting it into thin ribbons, which are then incorporated into devices. Researchers have made these nanoribbons with lithography, with chemical solution-based processes, or by unzipping carbon nanotubes. 
Graphene, an atom-thick carbon sheet, is a promising replacement for silicon in electronic circuits, since it transports electrons much faster. IBM researchers have already made transistors, the building blocks of electronic circuits, with graphene that work 10 times faster than their silicon counterparts. But to make these transistors, researchers first have to alter the graphene's electronic properties by cutting it into thin ribbons, which are then incorporated into devices. Researchers have made these nanoribbons with lithography, with chemical solution-based processes, or by unzipping carbon nanotubes.
http://www.technologyreview.com/computing/25547/

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